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Thursday, October 24, 2019

8:30 am

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 8:30 AM | End Time: 10:30 AM | Speakers: Brax Easterwood, AIA, Chula Ross Sanchez, Assoc. AIA | Price: $60.00
Credit: 2 LU | 2 HSW

This tour will explore the Green Revival House and Las Casitas, two projects completed in response to the devastation of Hurricane Ike in 2008.

The Green Revival House was the project that launched Green Revival, an initiative of the Galveston Historical Foundation merging environmental sustainability with historic preservation. GHF rehabilitated a pre-1900 historic house that had been knocked off its moorings by the hurricane using advanced technologies to reduce the building’s energy-use and carbon footprint. The project was the first historic residence in the U.S. to achieve LEED Platinum certification and demonstrated the compatibility of historic preservation and environmental awareness.

Las Casitas are three bay cottages built in 2013 replacing four buildings — three cottages from the 1930s and one from the 1960s — that were swept away by Hurricane Ike. Designed by Chula Ross Sanchez, Assoc. AIA, Las Casitas was the first LEED Platinum project on Galveston Island, and its first and only LEED for Homes certified new construction.

Attendees will have an opportunity to see first-hand the sustainable construction strategies used and their resilience to storms since Ike, including Harvey.

Photo by: John McNatt
Photo by: John McNatt

Start Time: 8:30 AM | End Time: 10:30 AM | Speakers: John McNatt, David Watson, AIA | Price: $60.00
Credit: 2 LU

 

The craftsmen at McNatt Contracting have created custom millwork for projects in the Galveston/Houston area since 1992, including rose windows for the restoration of Eaton Chapel, windows for First Presbyterian Church, and doors for various historic commercial buildings. Join John McNatt as he leads a tour of his 6,000-sf fabrication shop, demonstrating how the historic doors and windows are made and restored.

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Tour Sponsor: Building Solutions

Start Time: 8:30 AM | End Time: 10:30 AM | Speakers: Melissa Hall, Christine Hopkins | Price: $60.00

Credit: 2 LU|2 HSW

The 1911 Hotel Galvez, with its oasis-like forecourt and guest rooms facing the water, was built by a group of Galveston businessmen interested in promoting the city as a beach resort. The hotel was designed by St. Louis architects Mauran, Russell & Crowell and features a combination of Mission and Spanish Revival styles.

In 1940, W.L. Moody Jr’s National Hotels bought the Galvez and added a motel wing to the east side of the building. The hotel went through a massive refurbishing in 1965, but by the 1970s, it was in decline and closed in 1978. In 1980, a group of Houston investors hired John Kirksey Architects to rehabilitate the hotel and “the grande dame of the Seawall” reopened its doors.

In 1993, Galveston real estate developer George Mitchell and his wife acquired the property, and with the aid of Ford, Powell & Carson removed the additions from the 1950s, restoring the cool simplicity of the hotel’s promenade.

ARCHITECTS
Mauran, Russell & Crowell
John Kirksey Architects (1980 renovation)
Ford, Powell & Carson (1993 renovation)

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 8:30 AM | End Time: 10:30 AM | Speakers: Rachel Stelly, John Wolbrecht | Price: $60.00
Credit: 2 LU

Join us for a tour of the Texas home office of the American National Insurance Company. Once the tallest building in Galveston, One Moody Plaza boasts 23 stories and 360-degree views of Galveston island. The building, which features a cast-in-place concrete interior and a precast concrete exterior, was designed by architectural firm of Neuhaus & Taylor and completed in 1972. Attendees will visit the 20th floor observation deck, which was closed to the public in the 1990s due to security and liability concerns, and view an exhibit with historic highlights of the company and Galveston.

ARCHITECT
Neuhaus & Taylor

11:00 am

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Tour Sponsor: STG Design

Start Time: 11:00 AM | End Time: 12:30 PM | Speakers: Killis Almond, FAIA, Maureen Patton | Price: $60.00

Credit: 1.5 LU | 1.5 HSW

The Grand 1894 Opera House was purchased in 1974 and has been under a rehabilitation process since that time. The nonprofit organization has raised millions of dollars for the rehabilitation of the building and the upgrades necessary to make this performing arts theater a nationally recognized venue and a true theatrical showplace for the Houston/Galveston region. The Grand’s rehabilitation has been a multi-phased project, including many fundraising campaigns to support the phases: essential, early work to secure the envelope; a need for continued maintenance and upgrades to the building and structural systems; and the ultimate completion of the decorative interiors.

All of this was part of the ongoing rebirth of the theater, helping to revitalize Galveston’s downtown, establish its dynamic programming, and guarantee its future. The unusual caveat of the tour is that both the theater’s executive director and the architect have been on the project since 1981. This tour will explore The Grand Opera House and support areas while providing a discussion about the continuing preservation of one of the most significant performing arts structures in the state of Texas.

ARCHITECTS
Frank Cox
Killis Almond Architects (rehabilitation)

Photo by: Richard Barnes
Photo by: Naho Kubota

Start Time: 11:00 AM | End Time: 3:00 PM | Speakers: Troy Schaum, Melissa McDonnell | Price: $60.00
Credit: 2 LU | 2 HSW

Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee’s Menil Drawing Institute is the fifth building to join the Menil Campus. Opened in November of 2018, it is the first ground-up building dedicated to drawings and provides space for acquisition, exhibition, study, conservation, and storage. The architects liken the evolution of the Menil campus to a “chess match,” with their building responding to previous moves by Philip Johnson, Renzo Piano, and Francois de Menil, and expanding on the DNA of those seminal buildings. Join us as we explore the institute’s gallery, study center, conservation lab, and underground storage, along with its courtyards, designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates.

We will also visit the nearby Transart Foundation, by SCHAUM/SHIEH, named 2018 Building of the Year by The Architect’s Newspaper. Transart features a new double-height gallery, remodeled private art studio, and central core for meetings and research. The new sculptural building consists of three white stucco volumes with a facade peeling away at the corners. The architects have commented that they were “pursuing a sense of overall lightness” with the project and were interested in “how the geometry and material finish might make the building feel like it could blow away in the wind [or] scatter like cards.”

ARCHITECTS
Menil Drawing Institute

Johnston Marklee

Transart Foundation
SCHAUM/SHEIH

Photo by: Richard Barnes
Photo by: Richard Barnes

Start Time: 11:00 AM | End Time: 3:30 PM | Speakers: Jennifer Cronin, Karen Willis, Graham Beach, AIA | Price: $60.00
Credit: 2.5 LU | 2.5 HSW

Access to natural light figures prominently in the design of two new buildings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Join us as we tour these projects, built as part of the institution’s massive campus redevelopment plan.

Established in 1927, the Glassell School of Art offers courses in art history and studio arts for students of all ages, including postgraduate artists and critics in the Core Residency Program. The school’s newest home, completed in May 2018, is a 93,000-sf, L-shaped building designed by Steven Holl Architects with Kendall/Heaton Associates as architect of record. The facade features a series of 178 pre-cast concrete panels alternating with glass panes, some edges vertical and others cut at an 11-degree angle. The inside of this building is dedicated to light: the large apertures wash the 36 studios and exhibition spaces with daylight, and the central atrium is illuminated from above.

The new 38,577-sf Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation Center for Conservation brings all of the MFAH’s conservation departments together under one roof, creating one of the largest spaces dedicated to conservation in the world. Designed by Lake|Flato Architects, the center was constructed on top of an existing MFAH parking garage with lighting was the primary driving factor for the design: a soaring ceiling and clerestory windows flood the studio bays — areas for painting, sculpture, and decorative arts — with essential northern light; facilities requiring darkness and support spaces are located on the inward side and between the studios.

ARCHITECTS
Glassell School of Art

Steven Holl Architects
Kendall/Heaton Associates (architect of record)

Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation Center for Conservation
Lake|Flato Architects

1:00 pm

Start Time: 1:00 PM | End Time: 2:30 PM | Speakers: Brax Easterwood, AIA, David Watson, AIA | Price: $60.00
Credit: 1.5 LU|1.5 HSW

The United States National Bank, completed in 1925, was designed by Alfred C. Bossom with Sanguinet, Staats & Hedrick. Today, the 12-story Italian renaissance style building is a mixed-use property, serving as the home of Frost Bank, Kempner Capital Management, and other tenants. The property is currently undergoing a $14.9 million renovation that will transform the office space on upper floors into luxury apartments and add a rooftop event center with bar and pool, a street-level spa, and a yoga studio.

Chicago architects Weary & Alford designed the neoclassical stone and terra cotta headquarters for City National Bank, founded by Galveston financier William Lewis Moody, Jr. The building was completed in 1920 and bank operations were conducted there until 1962. After Moody’s death, his daughter donated the building to Galveston County, and it served as the Galveston County Historical Museum from 1976 until it was significantly damaged in Hurricane Ike in 2008. The building is currently being renovated into a residence and occasional venue for private events.

Participants will learn about the restoration/rehabilitation work completed in the decades prior to and after the hurricane, and view renovations underway on these buildings, both of which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

ARCHITECTS
United States National Bank

Alfred C. Bossom with Sanguinet, Staats & Hedrick
David Watson Architects (current renovations)

City National Bank
Weary & Alford
Brax Easterwood Designs (current renovations)

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 1:00 PM | End Time: 2:30 PM | Speakers: Dwayne Jones, Chris Arneson | Price: $60.00
Credit: 1.5 LU

Tour the award-winning rehabilitation of the Hendley Building (aka Hendley Row), made possible by Galveston philanthropists George and Cynthia Mitchell. After the set of 1850s buildings, which were once the largest commercial structure in Texas, were placed on Preservation Texas’ Most Endangered list in 2008, the Mitchells purchased the property and undertook a massive renovation project. It is estimated that the buildings had been without a roof for at least 10 years, and the exterior walls had deteriorated from two feet to the thickness of a single brick. After clearing damage from Hurricane Ike, crews restored the building envelope and transformed the first floor into white box retail spaces.

3:30 pm

Start Time: 3:30 PM | End Time: 4:30 PM | Speakers: Michael Malone,FAIA | Price: Complimentary
Credit: 1 LU

 

Join us for a tour in the Expo Hall exploring some of the highest-quality general contracting and construction management services available in the marketplace. The tour will visit the following booths:

– SpawGlass
– Teal Construction
– McCarthy Building Companies
– Rogers-O’Brien Construction
– The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company

4:30 pm

Start Time: 4:30 PM | End Time: 5:30 PM | Speakers: Peter Raab, AIA | Price: Complimentary
Credit: 1 LU| 1 HSW

 

Join us for a tour in the Expo Hall providing a hands-on survey of new wood products available in the architectural construction marketplace, and exploring resources available for code-compliant design of wood buildings. We will visit the following booths:

– LP FlameBlock
– Architectural Components Group
– Structurlam Mass Timber
– Bell Structural Solutions
– WoodWorks

5:00 pm

Start Time: 5:30 PM | End Time: 6:30 PM | Speakers: Jason Puchot, AIA | Price: Complimentary
Credit: 1 LU| 1 HSW

 

Join us for a tour in the Expo Hall providing a hands-on survey of new lighting products and technologies available in the architectural marketplace. We will visit the following booths:

–  Specified Int+Ex
–  DEA Specialties
–  Wagner Architectural
–  Dyson

5:15 pm

Friday, October 25, 2019

11:00 am

Start Time: 11:00 AM | End Time: 12:00 PM | Speakers: Audrey Maxwell, AIA | Price: Complimentary
Credit: 1 LU| 1 HSW

EXPO TOUR: All About the Baño

 

Join us for a tour in the Expo Hall providing a hands-on survey of the latest materials and products available in the architectural construction marketplace for modern bathroom design. We will visit the following booths:

Bestbath
Schluter Systems
MAPEI
Pietra Tiles
Georgia Pacific Gypsum
Infinity Drain

11:30 am

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 11:30 AM | End Time: 4:00 PM | Price: $60.00
Credit: 3 LU | 3 HSW

 

This tour will visit the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston to view, located on a contiguous campus, one of the largest concentrations of mid-century modern International Style institutional buildings in the country. This is a rare opportunity to see several historic and newer buildings not on the regular Space Center Houston tourist tram tour.

Born of the Cold War Space Race, JSC was the world’s first campus, built from scratch, to be a home training base for a corps of astronaut pilots and specialists. It has been the subject of multiple documentaries, dramatic motion pictures, and television news broadcasts; however, very few outsiders realize the diversity of specialized facilities all originally designed with the purpose of supporting human exploration of space. The story of the development of the JSC campus — the design and construction of its buildings — is almost as dramatic as the story of the NASA Space Missions themselves.

Particular emphasis will be in showing the dichotomy of the historic buildings first designed for the Gemini and Apollo Missions, and the ongoing, ever evolving, manned missions of today and the future. Enabling human beings to survive and thrive in deep space requires specialized facilities for training, research, and development that promote strong collaboration between sciences, as each mission’s safety is quite literally a matter of life and death.

12:00 pm

Start Time: 12:00 PM | End Time: 1:00 PM | Speakers: Stephi Motal, AIA | Price: Complimentary
Credit: 1 LU | 1 HSW

Join us for a tour in the Expo Hall providing a hands-on survey of masonry materials available in the architectural construction marketplace. We will visit the following booths:

–  Acme Brick
–  Blackson Brick
–  Espinoza Stone
–  Best Block
–  Minick Materials

 

 

1:00 pm

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 1:00 PM | End Time: 2:30 PM | Speakers: Melanie Herz Promecene, RID, Hector Covo, AIA, Scott Watkins, AIA | Price: $60.00

Credit: 1.5 LU | 1.5 HSW

We will explore the design influences behind Moody Gardens, from inception through modern day, and potential plans for this landmark in the future. Speakers will reference original blueprints and first-hand accounts to paint a picture of how Moody Gardens came to be, including design concepts, impact on the community, and resilience from the Gulf Coast hurricane season.

Start Time: 1:00 PM | End Time: 2:00 PM | Speakers: Zaida Basora, FAIA | Price: Complimentary
Credit: 1 LU | 1 HSW

 

 

Join us for a tour in the Expo Hall exploring the latest safety and security solutions available in the architectural construction marketplace. We will visit the following booths:

– Allegion
– Rollac Rolling Shutters
– Sunset Glass Tinting
– Access Products
– Galaxy Control Systems

 

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 1:00 PM | End Time: 3:00 PM | Speakers: Blake Von Blon, Veronica Von Blon | Price: $60.00
Credit: 2 LU

Over the course of his career, John F. Staub designed homes for some of Houston’s most influential families, but his favorite was the house he designed for Marie and William C. Helmbrecht in Galveston. The relatively modest home was built in 1928 for approximately $21,500 and designed in the French manorial-style. Staub described the house, with its two pairs of shuttered French doors and entry flanked by oval windows, as “perfectly simple.” Designated as a Galveston Landmark in 2016, the Helmbrecht home is maintained in its meticulous condition by the owners.

Tour attendees will be able to contrast the preservation focus of the Helmbrecht home with the adaptive reuse approach taken in the Brett Von Blon home, installed in the 1905 C. F. Marschner Building.  Now a private residence, the historic structure originally housed Texas Bottling Works on the first level, and an apartment for the owner’s family on the second.  The building incorporated Victorian, Romanesque Revival design and Italiante influences and featured arched portals for deliveries and shipments.

ARCHITECT
Helmbrecht Home

John F. Staub

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 1:00 PM | End Time: 3:00 PM | Speakers: Stephen Fox, Gaurav Khadse | Price: $60.00
Credit: 2 LU

This architectural walking tour of The University of Texas Medical Branch campus will focus on two significant buildings: N. J. Clayton’s Ashbel Smith Hall of 1891, better known as Old Red and now the oldest functioning, purpose-designed academic building in the UT system, and the Moody Medical Library of 1972 by Ford, Powell & Carson. Both demonstrate lessons learned about building in climatically unpredictable environments. Both represent the work of Texan master architects of different generations.

ARCHITECTS
Ashbel Smith Hall

N.J. Clayton

Moody Medical Library
Ford, Powell & Carson

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 1:00 PM | End Time: 2:30 PM | Speakers: Dwayne Jones | Price: $60.00
Credit: 1.5 LU

The Strand Historic District is one of the largest concentrations of late-19th-century Victorian-era cast iron storefronts in the United States. Declared a National Historic Landmark District in 1976, the Strand District encompasses the entire five-block business district between 20th and 25th streets and is near the city’s wharf. Galveston historian Virginia Eisenhour referred to the district as the “Wall Street of the Southwest,” as it reflects trade and commercial interactions and changes in Galveston as a link to settlement in the southwest from the 1830s to the middle of the 20th century.

The mostly brick buildings are one to three stories in height (with a couple of exceptions) and show a vast array of architectural styles and materials. The Galveston Historical Foundation focused its early preservation efforts on the district, implementing a highly effective revolving fund and inviting the firm of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown (Venturi and Rauch Architects and Planners) to prepare the first plan in 1974-75. This tour will look at current rehabilitation projects, explore postmodern influences in the district, and present an overview of preservation projects since the 1970s, including the work of Taft Architects, Ford, Powell & Carson, and other firms and individuals.

2:00 pm

Start Time: 2:00 PM | End Time: 3:00 PM | Speakers: Beau Frail, AIA | Price: Complimentary
Credit: 1 LU | 1HSW

 

Join us for a tour in the Expo Hall providing a survey of new materials and services available in the architectural construction marketplace. This tour will visit the following booths:

– Natura (interior horticultural design)
– Sierra Pacific (seed-to-window manufacturing)
– Plyboo (bamboo products and building materials)
– Rockwool (stone wool insulation)
– Xella Aircrete (aerated concrete products

 

2:30 pm

Start Time: 2:30 PM | End Time: 3:30 PM | Speakers: Mary Crites, AIA | Price: Complimentary
Credit: 1 LU| 1 HSW

 

Join us for a tour in the Expo Hall exploring the wide range of available window systems for commercial, residential, and historic restoration projects. We will visit the following booths:

– Andersen Windows and Doors
– Marvin Windows and Doors
– Portella Steel Doors & Windows
– The Cavallini Co. Stained Glass Studio

 

3:00 pm

Start Time: 3:30 PM | End Time: 4:30 PM | Speakers: Filo Castore, AIA | Price: Complimentary

Join us for a tour in the Expo Hall providing a hands-on survey of new interiors products and materials available in the architectural construction marketplace. We will visit the following booths:

– TRW Family of Companies
– Surfacing Solution
– Behr Paint Company
– Artisan Hardwood Floors
– Specified Int+Ex

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Tour Sponsor: Creative Combinations by Alex Gonzalez

Start Time: 3:00 PM | End Time: 4:30 PM | Speakers: Greg Lewis, Alex Gonzalez | Price: $60.00
Credit: 1.5 LU | 1.5 HSW

The Bryan Museum building had humble beginnings as the Galveston Orphans Home. Funded by financier, investor, and philanthropist Henry Rosenberg, a Swiss immigrant to Galveston, the original building was designed by Alfred Muller in a Gothic Revival style and completed in 1895. It featured double-wythe brick walls with cement plaster and wood framing, and a natatorium on the ground floor.

After the building was destroyed in the Great Storm of 1900, newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst held a charity event in New York City for a rebuild. Architect George B. Stowe reconstructed the building in the Renaissance Revival style, using brick with a terra-cotta trim. The first two floors were saved, and the third rebuilt. The building was reopened in 1902 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. It served as a state orphanage until 1983.

In 2013, J.P Bryan purchased the building to serve as a permanent home for his collection of more than 70,000 artifacts and artworks relating to Texas and the American West. Join us for this fascinating tour led by the architect of the project, who joined historic preservation contractor Alex Gonzalez to renovate the historic structure into an island destination.

ARCHITECTS
Alfred Muller
George B. Stowe (reconstruction)
Lewis Design Group (renovation)

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 3:00 PM | End Time: 4:30 PM | Speakers: Harold Thompson, AIA, Donovan Wattier, AIA | Price: $60.00
Credit: 1.5 LU | 1.5 HSW

This tour will visit Galveston Fire & Rescue Station No. 4, an award-winning civic project designed by HDR Architecture with English + Associates that proves an emergency operations and response facility located on a barrier island designed to resist Category 5 storms, tidal surge flooding, and the constant wind-driven humid salt air, need not resemble a military bunker. To the contrary, the memorable design forms, colors, and materials evoke the local coastal vernacular of the modernist raised beach house, providing the occupants with spectacular protected open vistas to the Gulf of Mexico and Galveston Bay beyond, the adjacent City of Galveston Scholes International Airport, which it also serves, and the neighborhoods of West Galveston, which it serves and protects.

ARCHITECT
HDR Architecture with English + Associates

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 3:00 PM | End Time: 4:30 PM | Speakers: Brax Easterwood, AIA, David Watson, AIA, Doug McLean | Price: $60.00
Credit: 1.5 LU | 1.5 HSW

The Galveston Arts Center (GAC) building is a neoclassical gem at the corner of 22nd and the Strand. Built in 1878 for the First National Bank of Galveston, the building was undergoing a restoration of its cast iron facade when Hurricane Ike hit in 2008. Had the architects not been structurally supporting the entire second floor brick facade, the building would have been lost. GAC, who has been housed in the building since 1968, undertook a seven-year capital campaign to raise funds for renovations, which were capped off by the installation of the restored cornice in May 2018.

The W.L. Moody Building of 1883 was built on the site formerly occupied by the 1872 Moody-Jamison Building and features the preserved cast iron facade of its burned predecessor. The Hurricane of 1900 destroyed the building’s roof, fourth floor, and cornice. The structure was repaired and remained the headquarters for Moody businesses until 1913. It was also home for 42 years to Colonel Bubbie’s military surplus store, which opened in 1972 and contributed to the revitalization of The Strand as a retail district. The building is now owned by another Galveston merchant, who is renovating it for retail at street-level with loft apartments above.

ARCHITECTS
Galveston Arts Center

P.M. Comegys
David Watson Architects (restoration)

W.L. Moody Building
Nicholas Clayton
Brax Easterwood Designs (renovations)

3:30 pm

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 3:30 PM | End Time: 5:00 PM | Speakers: Stephen Fox | Price: $60.00
Credit: 1.5 LU

Open Gates, built for Galveston entrepreneur George Sealy and his wife, Mary, was designed by renowned architect Stanford White, who also completed the Vanderbilt mansion in New York and the original Madison Square Garden. Finished in 1889, the 24,000-sf home features an opulent neoclassical, striped facade with Mediterranean-style arches, Spanish roof tiles, and elaborate detailing. In 1969, the home was donated to the University of Texas Medical Branch, who restored the building to its original splendor, with modernized systems, when it was significantly damaged by Hurricane Ike.

The family residence of W.L. Moody, Jr. was designed by William H. Tyndall. Built in 1894 and is believed to be the first home in the state to be built on a steel frame. It is a four-story building designed in the Romanesque style with a pressed brick and limestone exterior featuring rounded arches, turrets, and heavy stonework. The home also has stained glass windows, hand-carved woodwork, and ornate ceilings. After undergoing a meticulous restoration in the late 1980s and early 1990s, the home was opened to the public as the Moody Mansion and Museum.

ARCHITECTS
Sealy Mansion

Stanford White

Moody Mansion
William H. Tyndall

Saturday, October 26, 2019

11:30 am

Photo provided by: Perkins+Will
Photo provided by: Perkins+Will

Start Time: 11:30 AM | End Time: 4:00 PM | Price: $60.00
Credit: 2.5 LU | 2.5 HSW

The Port of Houston Authority Fire Station and Marine Emergency Building, designed by Perkins+Will, was completed in 2015. It is a one-story, 6,000-sf facility housing crew quarters, two apparatus bays, and support services for land and water emergency response. The dual-purpose building was designed with the principles of speed, efficiency, linearity, and durability in mind.

ARCHITECT
Perkins+Will

Start Time: 11:30 AM | End Time: 1:00 PM | Speakers: Dwayne Jones, David Watson, AIA | Price: $60.00
Credit: 1.5 LU | 1.5 HSW

This tour will visit two historic churches in Galveston, both built in the late Gothic Revival style. The first is Reedy Chapel, built in 1886 as the first African Methodist Episcopal Church in Texas. In 1848, the Methodist Episcopal Church South established a church for its slaves, who met outdoors until 1863, when a chapel was constructed for them. That church was burned down, and the new building, which came to be known as Reedy Chapel, was turned over to the newly freed slaves. The church, which is still in use, features a high, vaulted ceiling and 1872 pipe organ.

We will also visit St. Joseph’s, the oldest German Catholic Church in Texas and the oldest wooden church in Galveston. The structure, built by German immigrants in 1859-60 and dedicated to the patron saint of laborers, is simple, with a rectangular plan and bell tower. The interior features a coffered painted ceiling, the original altars, and many original furnishings and statues. The church was damaged in the Storm of 1900, then repaired, keeping its original architectural character. It was closed in 1968 and later purchased and restored by the Galveston Historical Foundation, who maintains the building for special events and private functions.

1:00 pm

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 1:00 PM | End Time: 4:00 PM | Speakers: Michael Imber, FAIA, Steve Mouzon, Eric Moser, Eric Brown | Price: $60.00

Credit: 3 LU | 3 HSW

Beachtown is a planned development on the east end of Galveston Island designed by well-known New Urbanists Duany Plater-Zyberk and Company. The inspiration for the town design is Galveston’s rich architectural heritage, and it is organized around a defined town center.

Steve Mouzon serves as town architect of Beachtown and reviews all plans submitted for compliance with the design aspirations of the community. The homes in Beachtown are designed by New Urban Guild architects, and this tour will include up to four homes.

ARCHITECT
Michael G. Imber, Architects

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 1:00 PM | End Time: 2:30 PM | Speakers: Stephen Fox, David Watson, AIA | Price: $60.00

Credit: 1.5 LU | 1.5 HSW

Three of the foremost works of 19th-century religious architecture in Texas lie within four blocks of each other in central Galveston. We will visit St. Mary Cathedral Basilica of 1849, the First Presbyterian Church of 1876, and Trinity Episcopal Church of 1859 and its companion, Eaton Chapel of 1879, to compare their architects’ adaptation of European models to “modern” conditions and assess conservation issues pertinent to each.

ARCHITECTS
St. Mary Cathedral Basilica

Theodore Eugene Giraud
Nicholas J. Clayton (1876 addition)

First Presbyterian Church
Nicholas J. Clayton
David Watson Architect & Associates (renovation)

Trinity Episcopal Church
John De Young Eaton

Eaton Chapel
Nicholas J. Clayton

1:30 pm

Start Time: 1:30 PM | End Time: 3:00 PM | Speakers: Daniel Pesek, Ray Holliday III, AIA | Price: $60.00

Credit: 1.5 LU | 1.5 HSW

Tour the recently completed Fire Station No. 1 in historic Downtown Galveston. This fully grant-funded project is a much needed-upgrade from the former Station 1 and includes apparatus and support spaces, crew quarters, and fire administration offices. Resilience was a critical factor in the design: The building features flood-resistant materials and techniques, hurricane wind and impact resistant construction, and corrosion-resistant materials.

ARCHITECT
BRW Architects

3:00 pm

Photo by: Leonid Furmansky
Photo by: Leonid Furmansky

Start Time: 3:00 PM | End Time: 4:30 PM | Speakers: Stephen Fox | Price: $60.00
Credit: 1.5 LU

A pair of Galveston landmarks located adjacent to each other in the city’s East End — Bishop’s Palace (also known as the Walter Gresham House) of 1892 by N. J. Clayton and Sacred Heart Catholic Church of 1904 by the Jesuit lay brother and architect Peter Jiménez SJ — attest to the exotic architectural identity of Galveston in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. We will visit both buildings and experience their equally amazing interiors.

ARCHITECTS
Bishop’s Palace

Nicholas Clayton

Sacred Heart Catholic Church
Peter Jiménez SJ